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Reputation Management (5)

7 min read

1 Negative Review Needs 12 to Counteract It

Have you ever bought anything online without looking for customer reviews first? If you’re like most adults in the U.S, your answer should be a straight “No!”. 

Studies suggest that 72% of online consumers read between two and 10 customer reviews and testimonials before actually making a purchase.Having no online reviews about your company is not a choice either.

Because, according to research, even if you get one negative review from a dissatisfied client (or a shrewd competitor who hires fake reviewers to defame you), you’ll need about 12 positive reviews to counter its effects.

9 min read

How long does reputation management take? Weeks to months.

One of the first questions we get from most of our reputation management clients is, “How long will reputation management take?” (The next question is of course "How much does ORM cost?")

Their anxiety is understandable considering that more than 80% of consumers now search Google before doing business with a company. What Google’s first page says about your business practically determines how potential clients and partners see you. And this is why determining just how long it will take to conquer that first page and secure your brands online reputation is not as simple as you might think.

17 min read

How to Delete Something from the Internet

Google results are permanent, right? Well, not always. So, how do you get something removed from Google search? There are five ways to remove content from Google search - or to effectively remove it. Content removal can be a tricky thing, but this guide should help. 

Seven ways to remove online content from search:

  1. Ask people to delete their content
  2. Remove content at the publisher level
  3. Ask people to change their content
  4. Make a page invisible to Google
  5. Google removal
  6. Suppress visibility

Bonus:

     7. Removing negative reviews

6 min read

How to find the bad news in corporate search results

Why did the organic for your branded search traffic just drop off? Was it a Google search algorithm change or was it the content of your results that changed? It's a nightmare situation when suddenly you find that you're ranking for negative search phrases appended to your brand name, like "fraud" or "scam." Prospects are fleeing. The sales staff are freaking out. 

10 min read

The elements of a web page for SEO

If you make or edit online content, you are a content creator. As a content creator, you’ll need to strike that balance between SEO (search engine optimization) and a positive user experience. Remember that you're creating content for both the humans that are reading your page and the robots that rank it for Google. 

93% of global traffic comes from Google search, Google Images, and Google Maps. Since so much traffic comes from search engines, it is critical to optimize your pages for SEO.  

There are several key SEO elements that every web page should have. To make sure everyone is on the same page, here is a list of the different elements that combine to create an engaging and well-optimized piece of content.

8 min read

How to find the search phrases consumers use to find you

a big megaphone

Which search phrases are killing your business? Is it [brand name] reviews? How about [brand name] complaints? Or, maybe it's just [brand name]. Check it now. We'll wait. 

Imagine your customer gets your business’s address from a friend, comes to your storefront, and every negative review from the last ten years is taped to the front window. At the same time, someone on the sidewalk yells through a megaphone, “don’t shop here even if it’s the last store on earth!” while a video showcases old footage of an employee stealing from a customer. Ouch.

You wouldn’t let it happen in real life, so why would you let it happen online?

5 min read

Competitive Intelligence for Reputation Management

One of the biggest mistakes people make when performing internet reputation management is to build a bunch of different web profiles and fill them with low-quality content. Worse, all these properties often can't be effectively maintained over time, and so loose relevance. The best way to manage reputation is to understand prospective customers, similar companies, and what search engines are looking for.

One of the first steps is to perform a form of competitive research called the internet reputation brand audit. Here's why. 

6 min read

How to rank above position 1? Get Position Zero.

Position zero article image on reputation x

Why do some web pages show up "above" the first search result? This is called a Featured Snippet, or "position zero" in the SEO field and it's one of the ways Google positions for SEO are counted. It's important because as voice search becomes more common, Google uses the featured snippet or "position zero" result for its "one true answers" response to voice searches.

For instance, we searched "featured snippet" in Google, and here's what happened:

5 min read

Branded vs. Non-Branded Content

branded-v-nonbranded-2.png

One of the questions we're asked most often is "What's the difference between branded and non-branded content?"

Branded content is clearly about you or your company. Non-branded content is not necessarily about you or your company at all, but it contains references to either.

Both types of content include your branded search phrase and assist in your online reputation strategy, but are structured differently. Both types of content require freshness updates.

5 min read

10 Best Resources to Learn SEO Step by Step

If you've ever wanted to learn search engine optimization (SEO) but don't know where to start - here is a list of the best resources we've found to learn SEO. Most of the steps below are free, some cost money, most just cost a lot of time. You'll also need a website to practice on and a good degree of patience to make even simple SEO improvements

Graphic provided by Crazy Egg

13 min read

Difference Between ORM, PR, PPC, and SEO

ORM, PR, and SEO -- what are all of these acronyms for? Let's break them down, and then delve deeper into how they all fit together.

  1. ORM: (Online reputation management) is the repair and maintenance of a person, company, or other entity's online image.
  2. PR: (Public relations) is the how organizations, businesses and people communicate with the public and media.
  3. SEO: (Search Engine Optimization) is the effort made by online content creators (of words, images, videos, or other media) to help a website rank higher in search engine results.

PR, SEO and ORM are all specialized disciplines of online marketing.

7 min read

Brand Touch Points and Their Impact on Search Results

Brand touch points are like digital fingerprints; they tell a story. What are brand touch points and how do they affect business? Whether you realize it or not, your brand's customer touch points are working to help, or hurt, your organization's reputation with consumers. If a potential customer sees brand-related content and it piques their interest, what will they do next? They may perform a branded search (using your company name), in which case it's up to Google what your customer sees. How dost Google love thee?

6 min read

Why Search Engine Reputation Management is Different than SEO

What is the role of ORM in digital marketing? What is the difference between SEO and ORM? S.E.O. stands for Search Engine Optimization. O.R.M. stands for Online Reputation Management. You may have heard of it referred to as Search Engine Reputation Management as well. SEO is generally concerned with getting a website to rank better for product or service-related search terms. ORM uses SEO, and a variety of other techniques, to improve the overall image of a brand. Both are subsets of online marketing

8 min read

How do people find your site?

There was a time when you couldn't get a chicken soup recipe while sitting on the toilet. Strange but true! It used to be that you asked your mom, or your friends, a book, or your local librarian for information. Today, instead of picking up the phone, everyone from bearded urban millennials to grandmas and dairy farmers turn to one place above all others: the Internet. How do people search? The three search types "do," "go," and "know." How people use them are explained in this article. 

29 min read

Where to Guest Post: A Growing List

So you want to contribute to a blog? Awesome! Enjoy this growing  list of sites that we're pretty sure accept guest blogger articles. The sites in the list below most likely accept third-party posts or in some way help bloggers by providing things like syndication. We haven't tested every one of these for writing opportunities, but we have tested to see if they are live. We update and grow the list on a 'fairly' regular basis. Summaries are mainly those of the websites themselves. 

6 min read

Why do people click on bad news? Negativity bias

Imagine that you saw two news articles. The first headline said "The weather is beautiful today!" While the second proclaimed that a dark storm was headed your way. Which would you click on?

Most likely the second, because you want to know how the storm may affect your day! It's the same approach used by the media for years, urging viewers to stay tuned to hear how certain things might be dangerous or cause turmoil in their life.

Because we’ve evolved to react to threats, humans have developed what is called a “negativity bias." Like Google, humans are pattern discovery machines; when something stands out, like a threat, our minds highlight it. 

Nearly since the inception of media, negativity bias has been leveraged by the media to increase profits, n. There was a time it was called "yellow journalism" and often contained outright lies presented as facts in newspapers of the day. Conflicts and wars were often begun based upon falsehoods presented in the press.

Now the act is most often used through clickbait headlines, sensationalism, and spin. Bad news still gets more attention, more clicks and leads to more revenue for publications. Google search results also react to this pattern by giving people what they seemingly want - that often means more bad news.


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